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Appl Environ Microbiol. 2011 Nov;77(21):7656-62. doi: 10.1128/AEM.05625-11. Epub 2011 Sep 16.

Complete genome sequence of the fish pathogen Flavobacterium branchiophilum.

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  • 1Institut Pasteur, Microbial Evolutionary Genomics, Département Génomes et Génétique, F-75015 Paris, France.

Abstract

Members of the genus Flavobacterium occur in a variety of ecological niches and represent an interesting diversity of lifestyles. Flavobacterium branchiophilum is the main causative agent of bacterial gill disease, a severe condition affecting various cultured freshwater fish species worldwide, in particular salmonids in Canada and Japan. We report here the complete genome sequence of strain FL-15 isolated from a diseased sheatfish (Silurus glanis) in Hungary. The analysis of the F. branchiophilum genome revealed putative mechanisms of pathogenicity strikingly different from those of the other, closely related fish pathogen Flavobacterium psychrophilum, including the first cholera-like toxin in a non-Proteobacteria and a wealth of adhesins. The comparison with available genomes of other Flavobacterium species revealed a small genome size, large differences in chromosome organization, and fewer rRNA and tRNA genes, in line with its more fastidious growth. In addition, horizontal gene transfer shaped the evolution of F. branchiophilum, as evidenced by its virulence factors, genomic islands, and CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) systems. Further functional analysis should help in the understanding of host-pathogen interactions and in the development of rational diagnostic tools and control strategies in fish farms.

PMID:
21926215
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3209149
Free PMC Article

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