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Reprod Toxicol. 2011 Nov;32(3):354-9. doi: 10.1016/j.reprotox.2011.08.006. Epub 2011 Sep 6.

Adolescent in-school cellphone habits: a census of rules, survey of their effectiveness, and fertility implications.

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  • 1School of Geography, Environment and Earth Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, PO Box 600, Wellington, New Zealand. mary.redmayne@gmail.com

Abstract

We explored school cellphone rules and adolescent exposure to cellphone microwave emissions during school with a census and survey, respectively. The data were used to assess health and policy implications through a review of papers assessing reproductive bio-effects after exposure to cellphone emissions, this being most relevant to students' exposure. All schools banned private use of cellphones in class. However, 43% of student participants admitted breaking this rule. A high-exposure group of risk-takers was identified for whom prohibited in-school use was positively associated with high texting rates, carrying the phone switched-on >10h/day, and in-pocket use. The fertility literature is inconclusive, but increasingly points towards significant time- and dose-dependent deleterious effects from cellphone exposure on sperm. Genotoxic effects have been demonstrated from 'non-thermal' exposures, but not consistently. There is sufficient evidence and expert opinion to warrant an enforced school policy removing cellphones from students during the day.

Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
21920431
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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