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J Occup Environ Med. 2011 Oct;53(10):1146-54. doi: 10.1097/JOM.0b013e31822b8356.

Fitness for duty: a 3-minute version of the Psychomotor Vigilance Test predicts fatigue-related declines in luggage-screening performance.

Author information

  • 1Division of Sleep and Chronobiology, University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. basner@mail.med.upenn.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the ability of a 3-minute Psychomotor Vigilance Test (PVT) to predict fatigue-related performance decrements on a simulated luggage-screening task (SLST).

METHODS:

Thirty-six healthy nonprofessional subjects (mean age = 30.8 years, 20 women) participated in a 4-day laboratory protocol including a 34-hour period of total sleep deprivation with PVT and SLST testing every 2 hours.

RESULTS:

Eleven and 20 lapses (355-ms threshold) on the PVT optimally divided SLST performance into high-, medium-, and low-performance bouts with significantly decreasing threat detection performance A'. Assignment to the different SLST performance groups replicated homeostatic and circadian patterns during total sleep deprivation.

CONCLUSIONS:

The 3-minute PVT was able to predict performance on a simulated luggage-screening task. Fitness-for-duty feasibility should now be tested in professional screeners and operational environments.

PMID:
21912278
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3190077
Free PMC Article

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