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Nat Methods. 2011 Sep 11;8(10):871-8. doi: 10.1038/nmeth.1694.

Miniaturized integration of a fluorescence microscope.

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  • 1David Packard Electrical Engineering Building, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA.

Abstract

The light microscope is traditionally an instrument of substantial size and expense. Its miniaturized integration would enable many new applications based on mass-producible, tiny microscopes. Key prospective usages include brain imaging in behaving animals for relating cellular dynamics to animal behavior. Here we introduce a miniature (1.9 g) integrated fluorescence microscope made from mass-producible parts, including a semiconductor light source and sensor. This device enables high-speed cellular imaging across ∼0.5 mm2 areas in active mice. This capability allowed concurrent tracking of Ca2+ spiking in >200 Purkinje neurons across nine cerebellar microzones. During mouse locomotion, individual microzones exhibited large-scale, synchronized Ca2+ spiking. This is a mesoscopic neural dynamic missed by prior techniques for studying the brain at other length scales. Overall, the integrated microscope is a potentially transformative technology that permits distribution to many animals and enables diverse usages, such as portable diagnostics or microscope arrays for large-scale screens.

PMID:
21909102
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3810311
Free PMC Article
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