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Food Funct. 2011 Jul;2(7):395-9. doi: 10.1039/c1fo10048c. Epub 2011 Jun 10.

Cardioprotective properties of raw and cooked eggplant (Solanum melongena L).

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  • 1Cardiovascular Research Center, University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Farmington, CT 06030-1110, USA.

Abstract

Although eggplants are known to be part of a healthy diet, the effects of this fruit on cardioprotection are not known. The present study examined the role of raw and grilled eggplants on cardioprotection using an isolated perfusion heart model. The animals were fed freeze-dried products of either raw or grilled eggplants for 30 days. After 30 days, isolated working hearts were subjected to 30 min ischemia followed by 2 h of reperfusion. Left ventricular function was monitored, and myocardial infarct size and cardiomyocyte apoptosis were assessed. To determine the antioxidant function of eggplants, their DPPH scavenging ability were determined, and polyphenolic components, especially nasunin content, were determined. The chemical composition of raw and grilled eggplants were determined in order to examine whether grilling was associated with major changes in their composition. The results of this study demonstrated eggplants as containing potent cardioprotective compounds judging by their ability to increase left ventricular function, and reduce myocardial infarct size and cardiomyocyte apoptosis. However, there was no difference in cardioprotective ability between the raw and grilled products. The antioxidant vitamins, including vitamin A, vitamin C and β-carotene, were lower and some of the polyphenolic components, especially nasunin content, were higher in grilled eggplants, but they were unable to demonstrate better cardioprotective properties compared to the raw fruit.

This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

PMID:
21894326
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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