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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011 Sep;165(9):806-12. doi: 10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.128.

Relationship between weekend catch-up sleep and poor performance on attention tasks in Korean adolescents.

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  • 1Department of Psychiatry, Gachon University of Medicine and Science, Incheon, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the relationship between insufficient sleep and poor attention in Korean adolescents, adjusting for potential confounding factors of depressed mood and habitual snoring.

DESIGN:

School-based cross-sectional study.

SETTING:

Eight high schools in 3 cities in the Republic of Korea.

PARTICIPANTS:

A sample of 2638 urban high school students (42.2% male and 57.8% female; mean [SD] age, 17.3 [0.6] years [age range, 14-19 years]) completed questionnaires and computerized attention tasks during the school term.

EXPOSURE:

Weekend catch-up sleep.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Self-reported sleep schedules and habits, including sleep duration, bedtime, wake-up time, depressed mood, and habitual snoring. Also measured were numbers of omission and commission errors on computerized attention tasks.

RESULTS:

The mean (SD) sleep duration on weekdays was 5 hours 42 minutes (1 hour 0 minutes) per day and on weekends was 8 hours 24 minutes (1 hour 36 minutes) per day. The mean (SD) weekend catch-up sleep was 2 hours 42 minutes (1 hour 42 minutes) per day. After adjusting for age, sex, depressed mood (Beck Depression Inventory score, ≥10), habitual snoring, and weekday sleep duration, increased weekend catch-up sleep was significantly associated with more omission and commission errors on sustained attention tasks (P < .001 and P = .03, respectively) and on divided attention tasks (P = .01 and P = .04, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS:

Increased weekend catch-up sleep as an indicator of insufficient weekday sleep is associated with poor performance on objective attention tasks. Assessment of catch-up sleep and sleep duration may be useful for physicians to evaluate sleep insufficiency and its adverse effects on attention in adolescents.

PMID:
21893646
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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