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Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2011 Oct 12;366(1579):2756-8. doi: 10.1098/rstb.2011.0075.

Twenty-first century vaccines.

Author information

  • Novartis Vaccines and Diagnostics, Via Fiorentina 1, 53100 Siena, Italy. rino.rappuoli@novartis.com

Abstract

In the twentieth century, vaccination has been possibly the greatest revolution in health. Together with hygiene and antibiotics, vaccination led to the elimination of many childhood infectious diseases and contributed to the increase in disability-free life expectancy that in Western societies rose from 50 to 78-85 years (Crimmins, E. M. & Finch, C. E. 2006 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 103, 498-503; Kirkwood, T. B. 2008 Nat. Med 10, 1177-1185). In the twenty-first century, vaccination will be expected to eliminate the remaining childhood infectious diseases, such as meningococcal meningitis, respiratory syncytial virus, group A streptococcus, and will address the health challenges of this century such as those associated with ageing, antibiotic resistance, emerging infectious diseases and poverty. However, for this to happen, we need to increase the public trust in vaccination so that vaccines can be perceived as the best insurance against most diseases across all ages.

PMID:
21893537
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3146774
Free PMC Article
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