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Surg Neurol Int. 2011;2:113. doi: 10.4103/2152-7806.83733. Epub 2011 Aug 13.

Intraventricular trigonal meningioma: Neuronavigation? No, thanks!

Author information

  • 1Department of Neurosurgery, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Most of the time meningiomas are benign brain tumors and surgical removal ensures cure in the vast majority of the cases. Thus, whenever possible, complete surgical resection should be the goal of the treatment.

METHODS:

This is a report of our surgical technique for the operative resection of a trigonal meningioma in a resource-limited setting. The necessity of accurate and deep knowledge of the regional anatomy is outlined.

RESULTS:

A 44-year-old male presented to our outpatient clinic complaining of cephalalgia increasing in frequency and intensity over the last month. His neurological exam was normal, yet a brain computed tomography scan revealed a lesion in the right trigone of the ventricular system. The diagnosis of possible meningioma was set. After thoroughly informing the patient, tumor resection was decided. An intraparietal sulcus approach was favored without the use of any modern technological aids such as intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging or neuronavigation. The postoperative course was uneventful and a postoperative computed tomography scan demonstrated the complete resection of the tumor. The patient was discharged two days later with no neurological deficits. In a two-year-follow-up he remains recurrence-free.

CONCLUSION:

In the current cost-effective era it is still possible to safely remove an intraventricular trigonal meningioma without the convenience of neuronavigation. Since the best neuronavigator is the profound neuroanatomical knowledge, no technological advancement could replace a well-educated and trained neurosurgeon.

KEYWORDS:

Neuronavigation; surgical resection; trigonal meningioma

PMID:
21886886
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC3162803
Free PMC Article

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