Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Science. 2011 Oct 7;334(6052):105-8. doi: 10.1126/science.1208344. Epub 2011 Sep 1.

Linking long-term dietary patterns with gut microbial enterotypes.

Author information

  • 1Division of Gastroenterology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. gdwu@mail.med.upenn.edu

Abstract

Diet strongly affects human health, partly by modulating gut microbiome composition. We used diet inventories and 16S rDNA sequencing to characterize fecal samples from 98 individuals. Fecal communities clustered into enterotypes distinguished primarily by levels of Bacteroides and Prevotella. Enterotypes were strongly associated with long-term diets, particularly protein and animal fat (Bacteroides) versus carbohydrates (Prevotella). A controlled-feeding study of 10 subjects showed that microbiome composition changed detectably within 24 hours of initiating a high-fat/low-fiber or low-fat/high-fiber diet, but that enterotype identity remained stable during the 10-day study. Thus, alternative enterotype states are associated with long-term diet.

Comment in

PMID:
21885731
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3368382
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (3)Free text

Fig. 1
Fig. 2
Fig. 3
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central Icon for Faculty of 1000
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk