Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Blood. 2011 Oct 20;118(16):4463-71. doi: 10.1182/blood-2011-05-355370. Epub 2011 Aug 25.

Novel protein ADTRP regulates TFPI expression and function in human endothelial cells in normal conditions and in response to androgen.

Author information

  • 1Cardiovascular Biology Research Program, Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City, OK 73104, USA.


Thrombosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD) represent major causes of morbidity and mortality. Low androgen correlates with higher incidence of CVD/thrombosis. Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor (TFPI) is the major inhibitor of tissue factor-factor VIIa (TF-FVIIa)-dependent FXa generation. Because endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction leading to vascular disease correlates with low EC-associated TFPI, we sought to identify mechanisms that regulate the natural expression of TFPI. Data mining of NCBI's GEO microarrays revealed strong coexpression between TFPI and the uncharacterized protein encoded by C6ORF105, which is predicted to be multispan, palmitoylated and androgen-responsive. We demonstrate that this protein regulates both the native and androgen-enhanced TFPI expression and activity in cultured ECs, and we named it androgen-dependent TFPI-regulating protein (ADTRP). We confirm ADTRP expression and colocalization with TFPI and caveolin-1 in ECs. ADTRP-shRNA reduces, while over-expression of ADTRP enhances, TFPI mRNA and activity and the colocalization of TF-FVIIa-FXa-TFPI with caveolin-1. Imaging and Triton X-114-extraction confirm TFPI and ADTRP association with lipid rafts/caveolae. Dihydrotestosterone up-regulates TFPI and ADTRP expression, and increases FXa inhibition by TFPI in an ADTRP- and caveolin-1-dependent manner. We conclude that the ADTRP-dependent up-regulation of TFPI expression and activity by androgen represents a novel mechanism of increasing the anticoagulant protection of the endothelium.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk