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J Occup Environ Med. 2011 Sep;53(9):975-80. doi: 10.1097/JOM.0b013e3182305282.

Unique features of obstructive sleep apnea in World Trade Center responders with aerodigestive disorders.

Author information

  • 1Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ 08903, USA. sunderja@umdnj.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To compare obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in World Trade Center (WTC) responders with aerodigestive disorders and snoring with non-WTC habitual snorers, and to distinguish features of OSA in a subset of responders with worsening of snoring after 9/11 from responders with previous habitual snoring.

METHODS:

Cross-sectional comparative study of 50 WTC Medical Monitoring and Treatment Program responders with aerodigestive disorders and snoring and 50 nonresponders with snoring. Responders with worsening of snoring after 9/11 were compared with previous habitual snorers.

RESULTS:

: While there was a strong correlation between body mass index (BMI), weight, and Apnea + Hypopnea Index (r = 0.36, P = 0.001; r = 0.29, P = 0.044) in the nonresponders, no correlation between either BMI or weight and Apnea + Hypopnea Index was found in the responders. Responders with worsening of snoring after 9/11 had a significantly lower BMI than previous habitual snorers.

CONCLUSION:

Mechanisms other than obesity are important in the pathogenesis of OSA in WTC responders with aerodigestive disorders.

(C)2011The American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

PMID:
21866046
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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