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World J Gastrointest Pathophysiol. 2011 Jun 15;2(3):49-52. doi: 10.4291/wjgp.v2.i3.49.

Resolution of metabolic syndrome after following a gluten free diet in an adult woman diagnosed with celiac disease.

Author information

  • 1Álvaro García-Manzanares, Department of Endocrinology, Hospital General de Tomelloso, Área de Atención especializada La Mancha Centro, 13700 Tomelloso (Ciudad Real), Spain.

Abstract

Adult celiac disease (CD) presents with very diverse symptoms that are clearly different from those typically seen in pediatric patients, including ferropenic anemia, dyspepsia, endocrine alterations and elevated transaminase concentration. We present the case of a 51-year-old overweight woman with altered basal blood glucose, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia and persisting elevated transaminase levels, who showed all the symptoms for a diagnosis of metabolic syndrome. Because she presented iron deficiency anemia, she was referred to the gastroenterology department and subsequently diagnosed with celiac disease after duodenal biopsies and detection of a compatible HLA haplotype. Gluten-free diet (GFD) was prescribed and after 6 mo the patient showed resolution of laboratory abnormalities (including recovering anemia and iron reserves, normalization of altered lipid and liver function parameters and decrease of glucose blood levels). No changes in weight or waist circumference were observed and no significant changes in diet were documented apart from the GFD. The present case study is the first reported description of an association between CD and metabolic syndrome, and invites investigation of the metabolic changes induced by gluten in celiac patients.

KEYWORDS:

Celiac disease; Gluten-free diet; Metabolic syndrome

PMID:
21860836
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC3158891
Free PMC Article
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