Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed. 2012 Jan;97(1):F56-61. doi: 10.1136/adc.2010.204123. Epub 2011 Aug 18.

Enteral feeding practices in very preterm infants: an international survey.

Author information

  • 1Department of Paediatrics, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway. claus.klingenberg@unn.no

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate enteral feeding practices in neonatal units in different countries and on different continents.

DESIGN:

A web-based survey of 127 tertiary neonatal intensive care units in Australia, Canada, Denmark, Ireland, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden and the UK.

RESULTS:

124 units (98%) responded. 59 units (48%) had a breast milk bank or access to donor human milk (Australia/New Zealand 2/27, Canada 6/29, Scandinavia 20/20 and UK/Ireland 31/48). The proportion of units initiating enteral feeding within the first 24 h of life was: 43/124 (35%) if gestational age (GA) <25 weeks, 53/124 (43%) if GA 25-27 weeks and 88/124 (71%) if GA 28-31 weeks. In general, Scandinavian units introduced enteral feeds the earliest, followed by UK/Ireland. Continuous feeding was routinely used for infants below 28 weeks' gestation in almost half of the Scandinavian units and in approximately one sixth of units in UK/Ireland, but rarely in Australia/New Zealand and Canada. Minimal enteral feeding for 4-5 days was common in Canada, but rare in Scandinavia. Target enteral feeding volume in a 'stable' preterm infant was 140-160 ml/kg/day in most Canadian units and 161-180 ml/kg/day or higher in units in the other regions. There were also marked regional differences in criteria for use and timing when human milk fortifier was added.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study highlights areas of uncertainty and demonstrates marked variability in feeding practices. It provides valuable data for planning collaborative feeding trials to optimise outcome in preterm infants.

PMID:
21856644
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk