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J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2012 May-Jun;19(3):346-52. doi: 10.1136/amiajnl-2011-000185. Epub 2011 Aug 17.

A framework for evaluating the appropriateness of clinical decision support alerts and responses.

Author information

  • 1Department of Biomedical Informatics, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee 77030, USA. allison.b.mccoy@uth.tmc.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Alerting systems, a type of clinical decision support, are increasingly prevalent in healthcare, yet few studies have concurrently measured the appropriateness of alerts with provider responses to alerts. Recent reports of suboptimal alert system design and implementation highlight the need for better evaluation to inform future designs. The authors present a comprehensive framework for evaluating the clinical appropriateness of synchronous, interruptive medication safety alerts.

METHODS:

Through literature review and iterative testing, metrics were developed that describe successes, justifiable overrides, provider non-adherence, and unintended adverse consequences of clinical decision support alerts. The framework was validated by applying it to a medication alerting system for patients with acute kidney injury (AKI).

RESULTS:

Through expert review, the framework assesses each alert episode for appropriateness of the alert display and the necessity and urgency of a clinical response. Primary outcomes of the framework include the false positive alert rate, alert override rate, provider non-adherence rate, and rate of provider response appropriateness. Application of the framework to evaluate an existing AKI medication alerting system provided a more complete understanding of the process outcomes measured in the AKI medication alerting system. The authors confirmed that previous alerts and provider responses were most often appropriate.

CONCLUSION:

The new evaluation model offers a potentially effective method for assessing the clinical appropriateness of synchronous interruptive medication alerts prior to evaluating patient outcomes in a comparative trial. More work can determine the generalizability of the framework for use in other settings and other alert types.

PMID:
21849334
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3341775
Free PMC Article

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