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Sex Transm Dis. 2011 Jul;38(7):634-9. doi: 10.1097/OLQ.0b013e31820bc86c.

Sexually transmitted infections and hepatitis in men with a history of incarceration.

Author information

  • 1Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI 53705, USA. jms@medicine.wisc.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Men entering correctional facilities have high rates of human immunodeficiency virus, sexually transmitted infections (STI), and hepatitis. Many prisons offer screening, treatment, and vaccination services; however, little is known about the rates of these infections in men after release to the community.

METHODS:

Young men were recruited from prisons in Mississippi, Rhode Island, and Wisconsin as part of a human immunodeficiency virus/STI/hepatitis intervention study. Participants were offered screening for Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC), Chlamydia trachomatis, trichomoniasis, syphilis, hepatitis B (HBV) and C (HCV) 6 months after release. Logistic regression was performed to identify associations with prevalent infections.

RESULTS:

Of 248 eligible men, 178 (71.8%) participated. Their mean age was 22.5 years, and 92% reported multiple lifetime incarcerations. At 6-month postrelease, 79% reported unprotected vaginal or anal sex, and 26% tested positive for 1 or more infections (GC, 1%; C. trachomatis, 12%; trichomoniasis, 8%; syphilis, 0%; HCV, 6%; HBV, 1%). Of all, 55% were susceptible to HBV infection. Active STI (GC, C. trachomatis, or trichomoniasis) was associated with less education (odds ratios [OR], 2.25; P < 0.05). HCV infection was associated with injection drug use (OR, 69.70; P < 0.05) and being white (OR, 7.54; P < 0.05). HBV susceptibility was associated with older age (OR, 3.02; P < 0.05), more education (OR, 2.39; P < 0.05), or incarceration in Mississippi (OR, 6.69; P < 0.05) or Rhode Island (OR, 2.84; P < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Effective screening and prevention programs are needed for this population before and after release from custody to prevent acquisition and further transmission of these infections.

PMID:
21844713
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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