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Brain Behav Immun. 2012 Jan;26(1):103-8. doi: 10.1016/j.bbi.2011.07.240. Epub 2011 Aug 6.

C-reactive protein is related to memory and medial temporal brain volume in older adults.

Author information

  • 1Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, Memory and Aging Center, San Francisco, CA, USA. bbettcher@memory.ucsf.edu

Abstract

Recent research suggests a central role for inflammatory mechanisms in cognitive decline that may occur prior to evidence of neurodegeneration. Limited information exists, however, regarding the relationship between low-grade inflammation and cognitive function in healthy older adults. This study examined the relation between inflammation, verbal memory consolidation, and medial temporal lobe volumes in a cohort of older community-dwelling subjects. Subjects included 141 functionally intact, community-dwelling older adults with detectable (n=76) and undetectable (n=65) levels of C-reactive protein. A verbal episodic memory measure was administered to all subjects, and measures of delayed recall and recognition memory were assessed. A semiautomated parcellation program was used to analyze structural MRI scans. On the episodic memory task, analysis of covariance revealed a significant CRP group by memory recall interaction, such that participants with detectable levels of CRP evidenced worse performance after a delay compared to those with undetectable levels of CRP. Individuals with detectable CRP also demonstrated lower performance on a measure of recognition memory. Imaging data demonstrated smaller left medial temporal lobe volumes in the detectable CRP group as compared with the undetectable CRP group. These findings underscore a potential role for inflammation in cognitive aging as a modifiable risk factor.

Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
21843630
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3221922
Free PMC Article

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