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Eur Radiol. 2012 Jan;22(1):120-8. doi: 10.1007/s00330-011-2237-9. Epub 2011 Aug 12.

The relationship between lung function impairment and quantitative computed tomography in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Author information

  • 1Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508GA, Postbus 85500, Utrecht, The Netherlands. o.m.mets@umcutrecht.nl

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To determine the relationship between lung function impairment and quantitative computed tomography (CT) measurements of air trapping and emphysema in a population of current and former heavy smokers with and without airflow limitation.

METHODS:

In 248 subjects (50 normal smokers; 50 mild obstruction; 50 moderate obstruction; 50 severe obstruction; 48 very severe obstruction) CT emphysema and CT air trapping were quantified on paired inspiratory and end-expiratory CT examinations using several available quantification methods. CT measurements were related to lung function (FEV(1), FEV(1)/FVC, RV/TLC, Kco) by univariate and multivariate linear regression analysis.

RESULTS:

Quantitative CT measurements of emphysema and air trapping were strongly correlated to airflow limitation (univariate r-squared up to 0.72, pā€‰<ā€‰0.001). In multivariate analysis, the combination of CT emphysema and CT air trapping explained 68-83% of the variability in airflow limitation in subjects covering the total range of airflow limitation (pā€‰<ā€‰0.001).

CONCLUSIONS:

The combination of quantitative CT air trapping and emphysema measurements is strongly associated with lung function impairment in current and former heavy smokers with a wide range of airflow limitation.

PMID:
21837396
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3229695
Free PMC Article

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