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Womens Health Issues. 2012 Jan-Feb;22(1):e1-7. doi: 10.1016/j.whi.2011.05.005. Epub 2011 Aug 10.

Incidence of sexually transmitted infections among hazardously drinking women after incarceration.

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  • 1Butler Hospital, Providence, RI 02906, USA. Michael_Stein@brown.edu

Abstract

INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND:

At the time of incarceration, women have a high prevalence of sexually transmitted infections (STI). In the months after community release, women remain at high risk for new infections. This study assessed the rates and predictors of incident chlamydia, gonorrhea, and trichomoniasis in a sample of hazardously drinking women after incarceration.

METHODS:

Self-reported behavioral data were collected from 245 incarcerated women. Vaginal swabs were collected at baseline, and 3- and 6-month time points and tested for chlamydia, gonorrhea, and trichomoniasis. Treatment was provided for all positive tests.

RESULTS:

Participants' mean age was 34.1 years of age; 175 (71.4%) were Caucasian, 47 (19.2%) were African American, 17 (6.9%) were Hispanic, and 6 (2.4%) were of other ethnic origins. The STI incidence rate was estimated to be 30.5 (95% confidence interval, 21.3-43.5) new infections per 100 person-years. Number of male sex partners reported during follow-up was a significant (z = 2.16; p = .03) predictor of STI; each additional male sex partner increased the estimated hazard of STI by 1.26.

CONCLUSION:

Incarcerated women who are hazardous drinkers are at high risk for STI in the months after their return to the community. In addition to testing and treatment during incarceration, post-release rescreening, education, partner treatment, and follow-up are recommended.

Copyright © 2012 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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