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BMC Res Notes. 2011 Aug 11;4:280. doi: 10.1186/1756-0500-4-280.

Determination of circulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains and transmission patterns among pulmonary TB patients in Kawempe municipality, Uganda, using MIRU-VNTR.

Author information

  • 1Department of Medical Microbiology, School of Biomedical Sciences, Makerere University College of Health Sciences, Kampala, Uganda. moses.joloba@case.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units - variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) genotyping is a powerful tool for unraveling clonally complex Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) strains and detection of transmission patterns. Using MIRU-VNTR, MTB genotypes and their transmission patterns among patients with new and active pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in Kawempe municipality in Kampala, Uganda was determined.

RESULTS:

MIRU-VNTR genotyping was performed by PCR-amplification of 15 MTB-MIRU loci from 113 cultured specimens from 113 PTB patients (one culture sample per patient). To determine lineages, the genotypes were entered into the MIRU-VNTRplus database [http://www.miru-vntrplus.org/] as numerical codes corresponding to the number of alleles at each locus. Ten different lineages were obtained: Uganda II (40% of specimens), Uganda I (14%), LAM (6%), Delhi/CAS (3%), Haarlem (3%), Beijing (3%), Cameroon (3%), EAI (2%), TUR (2%) and S (1%). Uganda I and Uganda II were the most predominant genotypes. Genotypes for 29 isolates (26%) did not match any strain in the database and were considered unique. There was high diversity of MIRU-VNTR genotypes, with a total of 94 distinct patterns. Thirty four isolates grouped into 15 distinct clusters each with two to four isolates. Eight households had similar MTB strains for both index and contact cases, indicating possible transmission.

CONCLUSION:

MIRU-VNTR genotyping revealed high MTB strain diversity with low clustering in Kawempe municipality. The technique has a high discriminatory power for genotyping MTB strains in Uganda.

PMID:
21835016
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC3162915
Free PMC Article

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