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Dermatol Surg. 2011 Sep;37(9):1260-7. doi: 10.1111/j.1524-4725.2011.02110.x. Epub 2011 Aug 11.

Evaluation of the effect of fractional laser with radiofrequency and fractionated radiofrequency on the improvement of acne scars.

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  • 1Dermatology Cosmetic Laser Associates of La Jolla, San Diego, California 92121, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Options for acne scar reduction include peels, subcision, fillers, lasers, dermabrasion, and surgical excision, although not all are applicable in darker skin types. A novel device with a handpiece combining optical and radiofrequency (RF) energies along with a fractionated RF handpiece is available for nonablative resurfacing.

OBJECTIVES:

Our primary objective was to evaluate the improvement in acne scars and skin texture. Secondary objectives were determination of patient satisfaction and comfort and evaluation of scar pigmentation improvement. Patients received five treatments at 30-day intervals. Post-treatment follow-up visits were performed 30 and 90 days after the last treatment.

RESULTS:

A 72.3% decrease (p<.001) was observed on the acne scar scale from day 1 to 210. From day 30 to 210, investigator-rated changes in scarring, texture, and pigmentation improved 68.2% (p<.001), 66.7% (p<.001), and 13.3% (p=.05), respectively. Patient satisfaction scores showed no significant change over time, although patient-evaluated overall improved scores increased 60% over baseline (p=.02).

CONCLUSION:

This technology may be a useful, nonablative resurfacing treatment for acne scarring. Scarring, texture, and pigmentation improved significantly according to investigator-rated assessment parameters. Although patient satisfaction scores did not improve, overall improvement scores did.

© 2011 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc.

PMID:
21834933
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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