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J Biol Chem. 2011 Sep 23;286(38):33003-11. doi: 10.1074/jbc.M111.279174. Epub 2011 Aug 2.

Involvement of human natural killer-1 (HNK-1) sulfotransferase in the biosynthesis of the GlcUA(3-O-sulfate)-Gal-Gal-Xyl tetrasaccharide found in α-thrombomodulin from human urine.

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  • 1Laboratory of Proteoglycan Signaling and Therapeutics, Frontier Research Center for Post-genomic Science and Technology, Graduate School of Life Science, Hokkaido University, West-11, North-21, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 001-0021, Japan.

Abstract

Thrombomodulin (TM) is an integral membrane glycoprotein, which occurs as both a chondroitin sulfate (CS) proteoglycan (PG) form (β-TM) and a non-PG form without a CS chain (α-TM) and hence is a part-time PG. An α-TM preparation isolated from human urine contained the glycosaminoglycan linkage region tetrasaccharide GlcUAβ1-3Galβ1-3Galβ1-4xylose, and the nonreducing terminal GlcUA residue is 3-O-sulfated. Because the human natural killer-1 sulfotransferase (HNK-1ST) transfers a sulfate group from 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate to the C-3 position of the nonreducing terminal GlcUA residue in the HNK-1 antigen precursor trisaccharide, GlcUAβ1-3Galβ1-4GlcNAc, the sulfotransferase activity toward the linkage region was investigated. In fact, the activity of HNK-1ST toward the linkage region was much higher than that toward the glucuronylneolactotetraosylceramide, the precursor of the HNK-1 epitope. HNK-1ST may be responsible for regulating the sorting of α- and β-TM. Furthermore, HNK-1ST also transferred a sulfate group from 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate to the C-3 position of the nonreducing terminal GlcUA residue of a chondroitin chain. Intriguingly, the HNK-1 antibody recognized CS chains and the linkage region if they contained GlcUA(3-O-sulfate), suggesting that HNK-1ST not only synthesizes the HNK-1 epitope but may also be involved in the generation of part-time PGs.

PMID:
21828042
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3190911
Free PMC Article
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