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Am J Clin Nutr. 2011 Sep;94(3):869-76. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.111.013219. Epub 2011 Aug 3.

A higher ratio of beans to white rice is associated with lower cardiometabolic risk factors in Costa Rican adults.

Author information

  • 1Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA. hcampos@hsph.harvard.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

A high intake of white rice is associated with the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Costa Ricans follow a staple dietary pattern that includes white rice and beans, yet the combined role of these foods on cardiometabolic risk factors has not been studied.

OBJECTIVE:

We aimed to determine the association between intake of white rice and beans and the metabolic syndrome and its components in Costa Rican adults (n = 1879) without diabetes.

DESIGN:

Multivariate-adjusted means were calculated for components of the metabolic syndrome by daily servings of white rice and beans (<1, 1, or >1) and by the ratio of beans to white rice. The OR for the metabolic syndrome was calculated by substituting one serving of beans for one serving of white rice.

RESULTS:

An increase in daily servings of white rice was positively associated with systolic blood pressure (BP), triglycerides, and fasting glucose and inversely associated with HDL cholesterol (P-trend <0.01 for all). An increase in servings of beans was inversely associated with diastolic BP (P = 0.049). Significant trends for higher HDL cholesterol and lower BP and triglycerides were observed for 1:3, 1:2, 1:1, and 2:1 ratios of beans to white rice. Substituting one serving of beans for one serving of white rice was associated with a 35% (95% CI: 15%, 50%) lower risk of the metabolic syndrome.

CONCLUSION:

Increasing the ratio of beans to white rice, or limiting the intake of white rice by substituting beans, may lower cardiometabolic risk factors.

PMID:
21813808
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3155926
Free PMC Article

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