Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Clin Infect Dis. 2011 Aug;53(4):388-95. doi: 10.1093/cid/cir413.

Effects of cessation of breastfeeding in HIV-1-exposed, uninfected children in Malawi.

Author information

  • 1Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA. ttaha@jhsph.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We assessed morbidity rates during short intervals that accompanied weaning and cumulative mortality among HIV-exposed, uninfected infants enrolled in the postexposure prophylaxis of infants in Malawi (PEPI-Malawi) trial.

METHODS:

Women were counseled to stop breastfeeding (BF) by 6 months in the PEPI-Malawi trial. HIV-uninfected infants were included in this analysis starting at age 6 months. Breastfeeding and morbidity (illness and/or hospital admission and malnutrition [weight-for-age Z-score, ≤2]) were assessed during age intervals of 6-9, 9-12, and 12-15 months. BF was defined as any BF at the start and end of the interval and no breastfeeding (NBF) was defined as NBF at any time during the interval. The association of NBF with morbidity at each mutually exclusive interval was assessed using Poisson regression models controlling for other factors. Cumulative mortality among infants aged 6-15 months with BF and NBF was assessed using an extended Kaplan-Meier method.

RESULTS:

At age 6 months, 1761 HIV-uninfected infants were included in the study. The adjusted rate ratios for illnesses and/or hospital admission for NBF, compared with BF, was 1.7 (P < .0001) at 6-9 months, 1.66 (P = .0001) at 9-12 months, and 1.75 (P = .0008) at 12-15 months. The rates of morbidity were consistently higher among NBF infants during each age interval, compared with BF infants. The 15 months cumulative mortality among BF and NBF children was 3.5% and 6.4% (P = .03), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

Cessation of BF is associated with acute morbidity events and cumulative mortality. Prolonged BF should be encouraged, in addition to close monitoring of infant health and provision of support services.

PMID:
21810754
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3202326
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk