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Biosens Bioelectron. 2011 Oct 15;28(1):204-9. doi: 10.1016/j.bios.2011.07.018. Epub 2011 Jul 20.

Direct electrochemical reduction of graphene oxide on ionic liquid doped screen-printed electrode and its electrochemical biosensing application.

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  • 1College of Biosystems Engineering and Food Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, PR China.

Abstract

A novel electrochemical biosensing platform using electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ER-GNO) modified electrode was proposed. This modified electrode was prepared by one-step electrodeposition of the exfoliated GNO sheets onto the ionic liquid doped screen-printed electrode (IL-SPE). The resulting ER-GNO/IL-SPE brought new capabilities for electrochemical devices by combining the advantages of ER-GNO and disposable electrode. Two important biomolecules, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), were employed to study the electrochemical performance of the ER-GNO/IL-SPE, which exhibited more favorable electron transfer kinetics than the bare IL-SPE. On the basis of the greatly enhanced electrochemical reactivity of H(2)O(2) at the developed electrode, ER-GNO and glucose oxidase constructed disposable biosensor showed better analytical performance for the glucose detection compared with the IL-SPE based biosensor. The linear range for the detection of glucose was from 5.0 μM to 12.0 mM with a detection limit of 1.0 μM. This work provides a useful avenue for implementing ER-GNO as a new generation of electrochemical transducer in disposable electrode, which could expand the scope of graphene constructed electrochemical biosensing devices and hold great promise for routine sensing applications.

Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

PMID:
21807494
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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