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J Am Geriatr Soc. 2011 Aug;59(8):1452-8. doi: 10.1111/j.1532-5415.2011.03511.x. Epub 2011 Aug 1.

Clinical significance of postvoid residual volume in older ambulatory women.

Author information

  • 1Department of Medicine, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA. ahuang@ucsfmed.org

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To examine the prevalence, natural history, and clinical significance of high postvoid residual (PVR) volume in ambulatory older women.

DESIGN:

Prospective cohort study.

SETTING:

Group health plan in Washington state.

PARTICIPANTS:

Nine hundred eighty-seven ambulatory women aged 55 to 75.

MEASUREMENTS:

PVR was measured using bladder ultrasonography at baseline, 1 year, and 2 years. Participants completed questionnaires about urinary symptoms and provided urine samples for microbiological evaluation.

RESULTS:

Of the 987 participants, 79% had a PVR less than 50 mL, 10% of 50 to 99 mL, 6% of 100 to 199 mL, and 5% of 200 mL or greater at baseline. Of women with a PVR less than 50 mL, 66% reported at least one urinary symptom at baseline. Of women with a PVR of 200 mL or greater, 27% reported no significant symptoms at baseline. In adjusted analyses using data from all study visits, women with a PVR of 100 mL or greater were more likely to report urinating more than eight times during the day (odds ratio (OR)=1.42, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.07-1.87), and women with a PVR of 200 mL or greater were more likely to report weekly urgency incontinence (OR=1.50, 95% CI=1.03-2.18) than those with a PVR less than 50 mL. High PVR was not associated with greater risk of stress incontinence, nocturnal frequency, or urinary tract infection in adjusted analyses. Forty-six percent of those with a PVR of 200 mL or greater and 63% of those with a PVR of 100 to 199 mL at baseline had a PVR less than 50 mL at 2 years.

CONCLUSION:

More than 10% of ambulatory older women may have a PVR of 100 mL or greater, which is associated with greater risk of some urinary symptoms, but many with high PVR are asymptomatic, and high PVR frequently resolves within 2 years. Symptom-guided management of urinary symptoms may be more appropriate than PVR-guided management in this population.

© 2011, Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2011, The American Geriatrics Society.

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PMID:
21806559
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3886558
Free PMC Article
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