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J Intern Med. 2012 Mar;271(3):264-70. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2796.2011.02429.x. Epub 2011 Aug 15.

Impaired cardiac function in chronic fatigue syndrome measured using magnetic resonance cardiac tagging.

Author information

  • 1Newcastle Magnetic Resonance Centre, Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, NE4 5PL, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. k.g.hollingsworth@ncl.ac.uk

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Impaired cardiac function has been confirmed in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Magnetic resonance cardiac tagging is a novel technique that assesses myocardial wall function in vivo. We hypothesized that patients with CFS may have impaired development and release of myocardial torsion and strain.

METHODS:

Cardiac morphology and function were assessed using magnetic resonance imaging and cardiac tagging methodology in 12 CFS patients (Fukuda) and 10 matched controls.

RESULTS:

Compared to controls, the CFS group had substantially reduced left ventricular mass (reduced by 23%), end-diastolic volume (30%), stroke volume (29%) and cardiac output (25%). Residual torsion at 150% of the end-systolic time was found to be significantly higher in the patients with CFS (5.3 ± 1.6°) compared to the control group (1.7 ± 0.7°, P = 0.0001). End-diastolic volume index correlated negatively with both torsion-to-endocardial-strain ratio (TSR) (r = -0.65, P = 0.02) and the residual torsion at 150% end-systolic time (r = -0.76, P = 0.004), so decreased end-diastolic volume is associated with raised TSR and torsion persisting longer into diastole. Reduced end-diastolic volume index also correlated significantly with increased radial thickening (r = -0.65, P = 0.03) and impaired diastolic function represented by the ratio of early to late ventricular filling velocity (E/A ratio, r = 0.71, P = 0.009) and early filling percentage (r = 0.73, P = 0.008).

CONCLUSION:

Patients with CFS have markedly reduced cardiac mass and blood pool volumes, particularly end-diastolic volume: this results in significant impairments in stroke volume and cardiac output compared to controls. The CFS group appeared to have a delay in the release of torsion.

© 2011 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

PMID:
21793948
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3627316
Free PMC Article

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