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Blood. 2011 Sep 22;118(12):3367-75. doi: 10.1182/blood-2010-11-320788. Epub 2011 Jul 26.

Identification of a specific intronic PEAR1 gene variant associated with greater platelet aggregability and protein expression.

Author information

  • 1Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine,J ohns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. nfaraday@jhmi.edu

Abstract

Genetic variation is thought to contribute to variability in platelet function; however, the specific variants and mechanisms that contribute to altered platelet function are poorly defined. With the use of a combination of fine mapping and sequencing of the platelet endothelial aggregation receptor 1 (PEAR1) gene we identified a common variant (rs12041331) in intron 1 that accounts for ≤ 15% of total phenotypic variation in platelet function. Association findings were robust in 1241 persons of European ancestry (P = 2.22 × 10⁻⁸) and were replicated down to the variant and nucleotide level in 835 persons of African ancestry (P = 2.31 × 10⁻²⁷) and in an independent sample of 2755 persons of European descent (P = 1.64 × 10⁻⁵). Sequencing confirmed that variation at rs12041331 accounted most strongly (P = 2.07 × 10⁻⁶) for the relation between the PEAR1 gene and platelet function phenotype. A dose-response relation between the number of G alleles at rs12041331 and expression of PEAR1 protein in human platelets was confirmed by Western blotting and ELISA. Similarly, the G allele was associated with greater protein expression in a luciferase reporter assay. These experiments identify the precise genetic variant in PEAR1 associated with altered platelet function and provide a plausible biologic mechanism to explain the association between variation in the PEAR1 gene and platelet function phenotype.

PMID:
21791418
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3179402
Free PMC Article

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