Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Pediatrics. 2011 Aug;128(2):214-20. doi: 10.1542/peds.2010-3385. Epub 2011 Jul 25.

Near elimination of varicella deaths in the US after implementation of the vaccination program.

Author information

  • 1Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. mmarin@cdc.gov

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Varicella has been preventable by vaccination in the United States since 1995. Previous studies reported a 66% decline in mortality rate during the first 6 years of the program. Since then, vaccination coverage has increased substantially. We updated the analysis of US varicella mortality for 2002-2007 and assessed the impact of the first 12 years of the US varicella vaccination program on varicella deaths.

METHODS:

National data on deaths for which varicella was listed as an underlying or contributing cause were obtained from the Mortality Multiple Cause-of-Death records from the US National Center for Health Statistics. We calculated the age-adjusted and age-specific mortality rates for 2002-2007 and trends since the prevaccine years.

RESULTS:

During the 12 years of the mostly 1-dose US varicella vaccination program, the annual average mortality rate for varicella listed as the underlying cause declined 88%, from 0.41 per million population in 1990-1994 to 0.05 per million population in 2005-2007. The decline occurred in all age groups, and there was an extremely high reduction among children and adolescents younger than 20 years (97%) and among subjects younger than 50 years overall (96%). In the last 6 years analyzed (2002-2007), a total of 3 deaths per age range were reported among children aged 1 to 4 and 5 to 9 years, compared with an annual average of 13 and 16 deaths, respectively, during the prevaccine years.

CONCLUSIONS:

The impressive decline in varicella deaths can be directly attributed to successful implementation of the 1-dose vaccination program. With the current 2-dose program, there is potential that these most severe outcomes of a vaccine-preventable disease could be eliminated.

PMID:
21788222
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk