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Bone. 2011 Oct;49(4):783-9. doi: 10.1016/j.bone.2011.07.003. Epub 2011 Jul 14.

The effect of static bone strain on implant stability and bone remodeling.

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  • 1Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden. anders.halldin@mah.se

Abstract

Bone remodeling is a process involving both dynamic and static bone strain. Although there exist numerous studies on the effect of dynamic strain on implant stability and bone remodeling, the effect of static strain has yet to be clarified. Hence, for this purpose, the effect of static bone strain on implant stability and bone remodeling was investigated in rabbits. Based on Finite Element (FE) simulation two different test implants, with a diametrical increase of 0.15 mm (group A) and 0.05 mm (group B) creating static strains in the bone of 0.045 and 0.015 respectively, were inserted in the femur (group A) and the proximal tibia metaphysis (groups A and B respectively) of 14 rabbits to observe the biological response. Both groups were compared to control implants, with no diametrical increase (group C), which were placed in the opposite leg. At the time of surgery, the insertion torque (ITQ) was measured to represent the initial stability. The rabbits were euthanized after 24 days and the removal torque (RTQ) was measured to analyze the effect on implant stability and bone remodeling. The mean ITQ value was significantly higher for both groups A and B compared to group C regardless of the bone type. The RTQ value was significantly higher in tibia for groups A and B compared to group C while group A placed in femur presented no significant difference compared to group C. The results suggest that increased static strain in the bone not only creates higher implant stability at the time of insertion, but also generates increased implant stability throughout the observation period.

Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
21782050
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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