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BMC Biotechnol. 2011 Jul 24;11:78. doi: 10.1186/1472-6750-11-78.

Sustained productivity in recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines: proteome analysis of the molecular basis for a process-related phenotype.

Author information

  • 1National Institute for Cellular Biotechnology, Dublin City University, Dublin 9, Ireland. paula.meleady@dcu.ie

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The ability of mammalian cell lines to sustain cell specific productivity (Qp) over the full duration of bioprocess culture is a highly desirable phenotype, but the molecular basis for sustainable productivity has not been previously investigated in detail. In order to identify proteins that may be associated with a sustained productivity phenotype, we have conducted a proteomic profiling analysis of two matched pairs of monoclonal antibody-producing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines that differ in their ability to sustain productivity over a 10 day fed-batch culture.

RESULTS:

Proteomic profiling of inherent differences between the two sets of comparators using 2D-DIGE (Difference Gel Electrophoresis) and LC-MS/MS resulted in the identification of 89 distinct differentially expressed proteins. Overlap comparisons between the two sets of cell line pairs identified 12 proteins (AKRIB8, ANXA1, ANXA4, EIF3I, G6PD, HSPA8, HSP90B1, HSPD1, NUDC, PGAM1, RUVBL1 and CNN3) that were differentially expressed in the same direction.

CONCLUSION:

These proteins may have an important role in sustaining high productivity of recombinant protein over the duration of a fed-batch bioprocess culture. It is possible that many of these proteins could be useful for future approaches to successfully manipulate or engineer CHO cells in order to sustain productivity of recombinant protein.

PMID:
21781345
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3170212
Free PMC Article

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