Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
Ann Intern Med. 2011 Jul 19;155(2):69-79. doi: 10.7326/0003-4819-155-2-201107190-00002.

Strategies to identify the Lynch syndrome among patients with colorectal cancer: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

Author information

  • 1Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA. uri.ladabaum@stanford.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Testing has been advocated for all persons with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer to identify families with the Lynch syndrome, an autosomal dominant cancer-predisposition syndrome that is a paradigm for personalized medicine.

OBJECTIVE:

To estimate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of strategies to identify the Lynch syndrome, with attention to sex, age at screening, and differential effects for probands and relatives.

DESIGN:

Markov model that incorporated risk for colorectal, endometrial, and ovarian cancers.

DATA SOURCES:

Published literature.

TARGET POPULATION:

All persons with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer and their relatives.

TIME HORIZON:

Lifetime.

PERSPECTIVE:

Third-party payer.

INTERVENTION:

Strategies based on clinical criteria, prediction algorithms, tumor testing, or up-front germline mutation testing, followed by tailored screening and risk-reducing surgery.

OUTCOME MEASURES:

Life-years, cancer cases and deaths, costs, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios.

RESULTS OF BASE-CASE ANALYSIS:

The benefit of all strategies accrued primarily to relatives with a mutation associated with the Lynch syndrome, particularly women, whose life expectancy could increase by approximately 4 years with hysterectomy and salpingo-oophorectomy and adherence to colorectal cancer screening recommendations. At current rates of germline testing, screening, and prophylactic surgery, the strategies reduced deaths from colorectal cancer by 7% to 42% and deaths from endometrial and ovarian cancer by 1% to 6%. Among tumor-testing strategies, immunohistochemistry followed by BRAF mutation testing was preferred, with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $36,200 per life-year gained.

RESULTS OF SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS:

The number of relatives tested per proband was a critical determinant of both effectiveness and cost-effectiveness, with testing of 3 to 4 relatives required for most strategies to meet a threshold of $50,000 per life-year gained. Immunohistochemistry followed by BRAF mutation testing was preferred in 59% of iterations in probabilistic sensitivity analysis at a threshold of $100,000 per life-year gained. Screening for the Lynch syndrome with immunohistochemistry followed by BRAF mutation testing only up to age 70 years cost $44,000 per incremental life-year gained compared with screening only up to age 60 years, and screening without an upper age limit cost $88,700 per incremental life-year gained compared with screening only up to age 70 years.

LIMITATION:

Other types of cancer, uncertain family pedigrees, and genetic variants of unknown significance were not considered.

CONCLUSION:

Widespread colorectal tumor testing to identify families with the Lynch syndrome could yield substantial benefits at acceptable costs, particularly for women with a mutation associated with the Lynch syndrome who begin regular screening and have risk-reducing surgery. The cost-effectiveness of such testing depends on the participation rate among relatives at risk for the Lynch syndrome.

PRIMARY FUNDING SOURCE:

National Institutes of Health.

Comment in

PMID:
21768580
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3793257
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (4)Free text

Figure 1
Figure 2
Figure 3
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Silverchair Information Systems Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk