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J Aging Res. 2011;2011:912680. doi: 10.4061/2011/912680. Epub 2011 Jul 9.

Successful aging and longevity in older old women: the role of depression and cognition.

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  • 1Department of Psychology and Institute of Gerontology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202-3801, USA.

Abstract

Based in successful aging theory and terminal cognitive drop research, this paper investigates cerebrovascular burden (CVB), depressive symptoms, and cognitive decline as threats to longevity. A subsample of stroke-free women over the age of 80 was identified in the Health and Retirement Survey (years 2000-2008). Mortality at 2, 6, and 8 year intervals was predicted using CVB (diabetes, heart disease, hypertension), depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale), and cognitive decline (decline of 1 standard deviation or more on the 35-point Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status over 2 years). At most waves (2002, 2004, and 2006) mortality was predicted by CVB, depressive symptoms, and cognitive drop measured 2 years prior. CVB and depressive symptoms at the 2000 wave predicted mortality at 6 and 8 years. Older women with the greatest longevity had low CVB, robust cognitive functioning, and few depression symptoms, supporting successful aging theory and terminal cognitive drop.

PMID:
21766034
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC3134221
Free PMC Article
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