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Neuroscience. 2011 Sep 29;192:773-80. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2011.06.032. Epub 2011 Jun 29.

Exercise influences hippocampal plasticity by modulating brain-derived neurotrophic factor processing.

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  • 1Department of Integrative Biology and Physiology, UCLA Brain Injury Research Center, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.

Abstract

Exercise has been shown to impact brain plasticity and function by involving the action of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF); however, mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Two types of BDNF coexist in the brain, the precursor (proBDNF) and its mature product (mBDNF), which preferentially bind specific receptors and exert distinct functions. It is crucial to understand how exercise affects crucial steps in the BDNF processing and signaling to evaluate therapeutic applications. We found that 7 days of voluntary exercise increased both pro and mature BDNF in the rat hippocampus. Exercise also increased the activity of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA), a serine proteinase shown to facilitate proBDNF cleavage into mBDNF. The blockade of tPA activity reduced the exercise effects on proBDNF and mBDNF. The tPA blocking also inhibited the activation of TrkB receptor, and the TrkB signaling downstream effectors phospho-ERK, phospho-Akt, and phospho-CaMKII. The blocking of tPA also counteracted the effects of exercise on the plasticity markers phospho-synapsin I and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP-43). These results indicate that the effects of exercise on hippocampal plasticity are dependent on BDNF processing and subsequent TrkB signaling, with important implications for neuronal function.

Copyright © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:
21756980
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3225196
Free PMC Article
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