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Zhonghua Yi Xue Za Zhi. 2011 May 24;91(19):1331-4.

[Preliminary clinical study on the posterior lumbar minimally invasive surgery assisted by 3D-Viewer system under a direct vision].

[Article in Chinese]

Author information

  • 1Department of Orthopedics, Affiliated Hospital, Putian University, Putian 351100, China. cxhcommon@gmail.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To study the methods and preliminary clinical efficacy of posterior lumbar minimally invasive surgery assisted by 3D-Viewer system under a direct vision and provide rationales for further clinical applications.

METHODS:

From September 2008 to September 2009, a total of 84 lumbar degenerative disease patients were enrolled and randomly divided into 2 groups (n = 42 each). One group was treated operatively by 3D-Viewer system under a direct vision while another treated with conventional operations. The lumbar paraspinal muscle approach was employed. Surgery was assisted by 3D-Viewer system under a direct vision. The operative duration, intra-operative blood loss volume, CK (creatine kinase) levels at Days 1 & 7 post-operation, atrophic rates of cross-sectional areas of bilateral multifidus muscles on MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) at 12 months post-operation were recorded. At Month 12 post-operation, the therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by Oswestry disability index (ODI) and the post-operative clinical effects assessed.

RESULTS:

The operative duration, intra-operative blood loss volume and CK level at Days 1 & 7 post-operation were statistically different (P < 0.05); there was significant difference in the atrophic rates of cross-sectional areas of bilateral multifidus muscles on MRI and the improvement rates of ODI (P < 0.001); the therapeutic efficacy of the invasive group was significantly better than that of the group treated with traditional operations (P < 0.05).

CONCLUSION:

The 3D-Viewer technique reduces the risk of damage. As an ideal minimally invasive procedure, it may achieve satisfactory outcomes for spinal diseases.

PMID:
21756760
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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