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Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2011 Jul;85(1):158-61. doi: 10.4269/ajtmh.2011.10-0203.

Serologic evidence of arboviral infections among humans in Kenya.

Author information

  • 1Center for Global Health and Diseases, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106, USA. chikungunya.ljs@gmail.com

Abstract

Outbreaks of arthropod-borne viral infections occur periodically across Kenya. However, limited surveillance takes place during interepidemic periods. Using serum samples obtained from asymptomatic persons across Kenya in 2000-2004, we assessed (by indirect immunofluorescent assay) prevalence of IgG against yellow fever virus (YFV), West Nile virus (WNV), tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), dengue virus serotypes 1-4 (DENV1-4), and chikungunya virus (CHIKV). Older persons on the Indian Ocean coast were more likely to be seropositive than children inland: YFV = 42% versus 6%, WNV = 29% versus 6%, TBEV = 16% versus 6%, DENV-1 = 63% versus 9%, DENV-2 = 67% versus 7%, DENV-3 = 55% versus 6%, DENV-4 = 44% versus 8%, and CHIKV = 37% versus 20%. Among inland samples, children in lowlands were more likely to be seropositive for CHIKV (42% versus 0%) than children in highlands. In Kenya, transmission of arboviral infection continues between known epidemics and remains common across the country.

PMID:
21734142
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3122361
Free PMC Article

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