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Obes Rev. 2011 Nov;12(11):887-96. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-789X.2011.00899.x. Epub 2011 Jul 4.

The prevalence of increased central adiposity in Australian school children 1985 to 2007.

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  • 1Kids Research Institute at The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. sarahg@chw.edu.au

Abstract

The epidemic of obesity as measured by body mass index (BMI) maybe plateauing. However, studies using skin-fold and waist circumference measurements suggest that BMI may underestimate changes in fatness in children. In this study we examine changes in waist circumference and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) in Australian children between 1985 and 2007, by undertaking secondary data analysis of three national data sets. The mean waist circumference z-score for boys increased from -0.02 (95% CI -0.05 to 0.01) in 1985, to 0.33 (0.26 to 0.40) in 1995 and 0.41 (0.35 to 0.47) in 2007 and was greater (P<0.001) than the increase in BMI z-score. The increase in mean waist circumference z-score for girls was greater (P<0.001) than boys and increased from -0.02 (0.05 to 0.01) in 1985, to 0.33 (0.26 to 0.41) in 1995 and to 0.57 (0.51 to 0.63) in 2007. The number of children with a WHtR ≥ 0.5 increased from 8.6% in 1985, to 13.6% in 1995 and 18.3% in 2007. Between 1985 and 2007 central adiposity increased at a faster rate than total adiposity, particularly in girls. The secular increase in waist circumference and WHtR is concerning as measures of central adiposity are associated with metabolic and cardiovascular risk.

© 2011 The Authors. obesity reviews © 2011 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

PMID:
21722299
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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