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Jpn Hosp. 2010 Jul;(29):59-64.

A case of laughter therapy that helped improve advanced gastric cancer.

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  • 1Noji Clinic. satoru_noji@msn.com

Abstract

We have reported the case of a patient diagnosed as having advanced gastric cancer at the age of 88 years old. An endoscopy revealed a type-2 gastric cancer of 25 x 30 mm in the lesser curvature of the middle stomach body and an IIa gastric cancer with T2 SS and cardiac accessory lesions. Both the type-2 and IIa lesions were defined as tub1 with surrounding atrophic gastritis and entero-epithelium metaplastic carcinoma. Considering the patient's age and her desire not to receive cancer treatment, we prescribed laughter therapy as recommended by the Society for Healing Environment. The program was implemented in a laughter-inducing environment and consisted of five stages: (1) Making the patient feel safe, (2) Relaxing the patient, (3) Increasing the effectiveness, (4) Improving her condition and (5) Increasing her joy of living. One year and seven months later, an endoscopy of the lesser curvature of the middle stomach body indicated that the lesions clearly improved with a morphological reduction into IIa + IIc masses. A tissue biopsy revealed that nucleus abnormality clearly improved from the initial diagnosis, with no irregularity in size. The suspected lesion was localized to a limited area near the stomach wall. Although partial gastric adenocarcinoma was suspected, the cancers turned into gastric adenoma, atrophic gastritis, and enteroepithelium metaplastic carcinoma. Now, five years after the initial diagnosis, she maintains a good condition. Laughter, one of our casual behaviors, has the effect of reducing the stress experienced by the human body. Laughter is expected to become alternative medicine in the future, and we hope to see more reports and evidence on soothing therapies using laughter.

PMID:
21706962
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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