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Cancer. 2011 Dec 15;117(24):5612-20. doi: 10.1002/cncr.26246. Epub 2011 Jun 20.

Human papillomavirus vaccine uptake among 9- to 17-year-old girls: National Health Interview Survey, 2008.

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  • 1Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Since 2006, the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine has been routinely recommended for preadolescent and adolescent girls in the United States. Depending on uptake patterns, HPV vaccine could reduce existing disparities in cervical cancer.

METHODS:

HPV vaccination status and reasons for not vaccinating were assessed using data from the 2008 National Health Interview Survey. Households with a girl aged 9-17 years were included (N = 2205). Sociodemographic factors and health behaviors associated with vaccine uptake were assessed using multivariate logistic regression.

RESULTS:

Overall, 2.8% of 9- to 10-year-olds, 14.7% of 11- to 12-year-olds, and 25.4% of 13- to 17-year-olds received at least 1 dose of HPV vaccine; 5.5% of 11- to 12-year-olds and 10.7% of 13- to 17-year-olds received all 3 doses. Factors associated with higher uptake in multivariate analysis included less than high school parental education, well-child check and influenza shot in the past year, and parental familiarity with HPV vaccine. Parents' primary reasons for not vaccinating were beliefs that their daughters did not need vaccination, that their daughters were not sexually active, or had insufficient vaccine knowledge. More parents with private insurance (58.0%) than public (39.8%) or no insurance (39.5%) would pay $360-$500 to vaccinate their daughters.

CONCLUSIONS:

Less than one quarter of girls aged 9-17 years had initiated HPV vaccination by the end of 2008. Efforts to increase HPV uptake should focus on girls in the target age group, encourage providers to educate parents, and promote access to reduced-cost vaccines.

Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

PMID:
21692069
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3179804
Free PMC Article

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