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Allergol Int. 2011 Dec;60(4):473-81. doi: 10.2332/allergolint.10-OA-0296. Epub 2011 Jun 25.

Addition of leukotriene receptor antagonists to inhaled corticosteroids improved QOL of patients with bronchial asthma surveyed in suburban Tokyo, Japan.

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  • 1Center for Pulmonary Diseases, National Hospital Organization Tokyo National Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. oshima-nobuharu@umin.ac.jp

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Bronchial asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease that has a severe impact on health worldwide.

METHODS:

A survey of 10,771 patients with bronchial asthma in the Tama region, Tokyo was conducted for 5 years to examine treatment and quality of life (QOL). Subjects were patients aged ≥ 16 years and their physicians who replied to a questionnaire sent in November from 2002 to 2006. Symptoms of bronchial asthma, visits to an emergency room, use of drugs, and severity of asthma were investigated.

RESULTS:

Asthmatic symptoms improved over the 5 years, with a reduction in the number of emergency room visits. Since inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) were used by >80% of patients in 2002, we suspected that increased use of concomitant leukotriene receptor antagonists (LTRA) and long-acting β(2) agonists (LABA) might have contributed to these findings. The effects of these drugs were compared between ICS + LTRA (n = 45) and ICS + LABA (n = 54) groups of patients. There was no significant difference in the ICS dose between these groups. In the ICS + LABA group, 18.5% and 22.2% of patients visited an emergency room before and after initiation of combination therapy, respectively, with no statistically significant difference. In contrast, the rate of emergency room visits in the ICS + LTRA group decreased from 24.4% to 6.6% after addition of LTRA.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results suggest that the frequency of visits to an emergency room was decreased by complementing the anti-inflammatory effect of ICS with further treatment of inflammation, particularly with LTRA.

PMID:
21681017
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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