Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Am J Otolaryngol. 2012 Mar-Apr;33(2):199-204. doi: 10.1016/j.amjoto.2011.04.009.

Elective neck dissection for second primary after previous definitive radiotherapy.

Author information

  • 1Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL, USA

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The aim of this study was to define the role of neck dissection during surgery for patients who have received elective nodal irradiation in the course of treatment for a prior squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) and are subsequently diagnosed with a second primary SCCHN.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

We reviewed the medical records of 13 patients who received both definitive radiotherapy and elective nodal irradiation for T1-4 N0 M0 SCCHN of the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, or larynx who then subsequently developed a metachronous T1-4 N0 M0 SCCHN primary at a new site. All second primary tumors were treated with surgery. Ten of the 13 patients also received an elective neck dissection (END) at that time: 7 unilateral and 3 bilateral. We report the outcomes for the patients in this series.

RESULTS:

One (8%) of 13 neck dissection specimens was positive in 1 (10%) of 10 patients. The 5-year outcomes were the following: local-regional control, 67%; local control, 77%; disease-free survival, 62%; overall survival, 38%; and cause-specific survival rate, 77%. Six patients experienced treatment-related complications of grade 2 or higher (per Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4). Complications occurred exclusively in patients who received an END.

CONCLUSIONS:

The risk of occult nodal disease may be low enough to justify omitting an END for a second primary SCCHN in selected patients while maintaining treatment efficacy and reducing patient morbidity. Larger studies on this subject are needed to further address this question.

Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
21658804
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk