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Dtsch Med Wochenschr. 2011 Jun;136(24):1299-304. doi: 10.1055/s-0031-1280550. Epub 2011 Jun 7.

[Rate of influenza vaccination among medical staff working at a university hospital].

[Article in German]

Author information

  • 1Institut für Virologie, Universitätsklinikum Essen.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJEKTIVES: In 1988 the German Vaccination Board (STIKO) at the Robert-Koch-Institute (RKI) in Berlin, recommended that German health care workers should be vaccinated annually against influenza. Despite this, vaccination rates have remained low (20 %). Between January and March 2009 a study was performed at the University Clinical Centre in Essen to determine reasons for low influenza vaccination rates and to assess improvement strategies.

METHODS:

All employees and staff members of the University Hospital (n = 5349) were asked to fill in a questionnaire anonymously. The completed questionnaires were digitalized and the results analysed electronically.

RESULTS:

1 670 of the 5 349 (31 %) questionnaires were found to be satisfactory for evaluation. The vaccination rate among this cohort was 29 %. Vaccination rates varied widely between different departments (4 - 71 %). The most common reason for not undergoing vaccination was "forgotten" (32 %). The second most common reason was the fear of side effects (30 %). Only 32 % of the employees stated that the quality of the information about influenza vaccination provided by their employer was "good" or "very good".

CONCLUSION:

The vaccination rate of 29 % among this group of health care workers was higher than the average (20 %) in German hospitals and highest among medical doctors. Strikingly enough employees of theoretic departments were vaccinated to a higher percentage than those providing nursing care and thus had more frequent contact to patients. A number of comparatively basic and inexpensive measures would be enough to increase vaccination rates significantly.

© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

PMID:
21656449
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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