Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Am J Public Health. 2011 Dec;101(12):2349-56. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2010.300084. Epub 2011 Jun 8.

Using extended cognitive behavioral treatment and medication to treat dependent smokers.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, 94143, USA. sharon.hall@ucsf.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We evaluated smoking-cessation efficacy of an extended course of sustained-release bupropion (bupropion SR) and cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT).

METHODS:

Participants who smoked at least 10 cigarettes per day and who smoked within 30 minutes of arising (n = 406) completed a 12-week smoking-cessation treatment including group counseling, nicotine-replacement therapy, and bupropion SR. Participants were then randomly assigned to 1 of 5 conditions: (1) no further treatment, (2) active bupropion SR for 40 weeks, (3) placebo for 40 weeks, (4) active bupropion SR and 11 sessions of CBT for 40 weeks (A-CBT), or (5) placebo and 11 sessions of CBT for 40 weeks. Participants were assessed at baseline and at weeks 12, 24, 52, 64, and 104.

RESULTS:

A-CBT was not superior to the other 3 extended treatments. From weeks 12 through 104, all extended treatment conditions were superior to standard treatment. At weeks 64 and 104, the 2 CBT conditions produced significantly higher abstinence rates than did the other 3 conditions.

CONCLUSIONS:

Brief contact with providers can increase abstinence during treatment. CBT may increase long-term abstinence after extended treatment is terminated.

PMID:
21653904
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3222443
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (3)Free text

FIGURE 1
FIGURE 2
FIGURE 3
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for Atypon Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk