Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Proc Biol Sci. 2012 Jan 22;279(1727):299-308. doi: 10.1098/rspb.2011.0826. Epub 2011 Jun 8.

Trophic network structure emerges through antagonistic coevolution in temporally varying environments.

Author information

  • 1Institut des Sciences de l'Evolution, UMR 5554, Université Montpellier II, Place Eugène Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 05, France. tpoisot@um2.fr

Abstract

Understanding the mechanisms underlying ecological specialization is central to our understanding of community ecology and evolution. Although theoretical work has investigated how variable environments may affect specialization in single species, little is known about how such variation impacts bipartite network structure in antagonistically coevolving systems. Here, we develop and analyse a general model of victim-enemy coevolution that explicitly includes resource and population dynamics. We investigate how temporal environmental heterogeneity affects the evolution of specialization and associated community structure. Environmental productivity influences victim investment in resistance, which will shape patterns of specialization through its regulating effect on enemy investment in infectivity. We also investigate the epidemiological consequences of environmental variability and show that enemy population density is maximized for intermediate lengths of productive seasons, which corresponds to situations where enemies can evolve higher infectivity than victims can evolve defence. We discuss our results in the light of empirical studies, and further highlight ways in which our model applies to a range of natural systems.

PMID:
21653583
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3223677
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (4)Free text

Figure 1.
Figure 2.
Figure 3.
Figure 4.
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk