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Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2011 Aug;34(3):363-73. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2036.2011.04731.x. Epub 2011 Jun 9.

Association of participation in a mindfulness programme with bowel symptoms, gastrointestinal symptom-specific anxiety and quality of life.

Author information

  • 1VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, WA 98108, USA. David.kearney@va.gov

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Stress perception and GI-specific anxiety play key roles in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) is a widely available stress reduction course, which has not been evaluated for IBS.

AIM:

To determine whether participation in MBSR is associated with improvement in bowel symptoms, GI-specific anxiety, and IBS-Quality of Life.

METHODS:

This is a prospective study of 93 participants in MBSR. We applied measures of Rome III IBS status, bowel symptoms (IBS-Severity Scoring System, IBS-SSS), IBS-Quality of Life (IBS-QOL), GI-specific anxiety (Visceral Sensitivity Index, VSI), mindfulness (Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire-FFMQ), and functional status (SF-8) at baseline and 2 and 6 months after enrolment.

RESULTS:

At 2 months, participation in MBSR was associated with small nonsignificant changes in IBS-SSS, IBS-QOL and VSI: d = -0.25, d = 0.08, d = -0.16, respectively. At 6 months, there was no significant change in IBS-SSS (d = -0.36); whereas for IBS-QOL and VSI there were significant improvements (IBS-QOL: d = 0.33, P = 0.044; VSI: d = -0.40, P = 0.014). For patients meeting Rome III IBS criteria (n = 43), changes in IBS-SSS, IBS-QOL and VSI were not statistically significant, but there was a significant correlation between the change in VSI and the change in FFMQ across the three time periods (r = 0.33).

CONCLUSIONS:

Participation in MBSR is associated with improvement IBS-related quality of life and GI-specific anxiety. Randomised controlled trials are warranted to further assess the role of MBSR for IBS symptomatology.

Published 2011.This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

Comment in

PMID:
21651595
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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