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Neuropharmacology. 2011 Sep;61(4):770-7. doi: 10.1016/j.neuropharm.2011.05.023. Epub 2011 May 27.

Functional crosstalk and heteromerization of serotonin 5-HT2A and dopamine D2 receptors.

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  • 1Department of Neurology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029, USA.

Abstract

The serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptor (5-HT(2A)R) and dopamine D(2) receptor (D(2)R) are high-affinity G protein-coupled receptor targets for two different classes of antipsychotic drugs used to treat schizophrenia. Interestingly, the antipsychotic effects are not based on the regulation of same signaling mediators since activation of the 5-HT(2A)R and of the D(2)R regulate G(q/11) protein and G(i/o) protein, respectively. Here we use radioligand binding and second messenger production assays to provide evidence for a functional crosstalk between 5-HT(2A)R and D(2)R in brain and in HEK293 cells. D(2)R activation increases the hallucinogenic agonist affinity for 5-HT(2A)R and decreases the 5-HT(2A)R induced inositol phosphate production. In vivo, 5-HT(2A)R expression is necessary for the full effects of D(2)R antagonist on MK-801-induced locomotor activity. Co-immunoprecipitation studies show that the two receptors can physically interact in HEK293 cells and raise the possibility that a receptor heterocomplex mediates the crosstalk observed. The existence of this 5-HT(2A)R-D(2)R heteromer and crosstalk may have implications for diseases involving alterations of serotonin and dopamine systems and for the development of new classes of therapeutic drugs.

Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

PMID:
21645528
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3556730
Free PMC Article

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