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Brain Inj. 2011;25(9):882-94. doi: 10.3109/02699052.2011.581638. Epub 2011 Jun 1.

Children's longing for everydayness: life following traumatic brain injury in the USA.

Author information

  • 1College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, 845 South Damen Avenue MC 802, Chicago, IL 60612, USA. roscigno@uic.edu

Abstract

PRIMARY OBJECTIVE:

Little is known about life after traumatic brain injury (TBI) from the child's perspective.

RESEARCH DESIGN:

This descriptive phenomenological investigation explored themes of children's experiences following moderate-to-severe TBI.

METHODS AND PROCEDURES:

INCLUSION CRITERIA:

(1) 6-18 years of age at injury; (2) moderate-to-severe TBI; (3) ā‰¤3 years since injury; and (4) English speaking and could participate in an interview. Children participated (nā€‰=ā€‰39) in two interviews at least 1 year apart. A preliminary model was developed and shared for participants' input.

MAIN OUTCOMES AND RESULTS:

Six themes emerged: (1) it is like waking up in a bad dream; (2) I thought going home would get me back to my old life, but it did not; (3) everything is such hard work; (4) you feel like you will never be like the person you were before; (5) it is not all bad; and (6) some people get it, but many people do not.

CONCLUSIONS:

Social support was important to how children adjusted to changes or losses. Most children did adjust to functional changes by second interviews. Children had a more difficult time adjusting to how others defined them and limited their possibilities for a meaningful life.

PMID:
21631183
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3438903
Free PMC Article
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