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Surgery. 2011 Nov;150(5):950-8. doi: 10.1016/j.surg.2011.02.017. Epub 2011 May 31.

Thyroidectomy and parathyroidectomy in patients with high body mass index are safe overall: analysis of 26,864 patients.

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  • 1Department of Surgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Obesity is a national epidemic. Prior studies of the impact of body mass index (BMI) on surgical outcomes from cervical endocrine procedures have come from high-volume, single institutions. Our study characterizes the 30-day clinical and economic outcomes in patients with high BMI from a multi-institutional database.

METHODS:

Patients undergoing thyroidectomy or parathyroidectomy in the American College of Surgeons National Surgery Quality Improvement Program, 2005-2008 were categorized into 4 groups BMI based on: normal, overweight, obese, and morbidly obese. Overweight, obese, and morbidly obese patients were compared with patients with normal BMI using a χ(2) test and an analysis of variance. Multivariable linear/logistic regression models were used to adjust for preoperative risk factors.

RESULTS:

In all, 18,825 patients underwent thyroidectomy. Overweight, obese, and morbidly obese patients were more likely to have total thyroidectomy, substernal thyroids, general anesthesia, operations of greater duration, and an overall or wound complication (all P < .01). On a multivariable analysis, morbidly obese patients had an increased risk for urinary complications (P < .05); obese and morbidly obese patients had an increased risk for overall or wound complications (P < .01); overweight, obese, and morbidly obese patients had operations of greater duration (P < .05). In all, 8,039 patients underwent parathyroidectomy. Overweight, obese, and morbidly obese patients were more likely to have general anesthesia and operations of greater duration (all P < .01). On multivariable analysis, morbidly obese patients had operations of greater duration (P < .05) and more wound complications (P = .05).

CONCLUSION:

Patients with high BMI seem to require operations of greater duration and sustain more morbidity after cervical endocrine procedures than patients with normal BMI, but these differences may not be clinically significant. Thyroidectomy and parathyroidectomy can be performed safely, with appropriate surgical decision making.

Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
21621238
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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