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Ann Behav Med. 2011 Oct;42(2):257-61. doi: 10.1007/s12160-011-9283-z.

Specific effects of a calorie-based intervention on stair climbing in overweight commuters.

Author information

  • 1Department of Primary Care Clinical Sciences, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, UK. a.lewis.1@bham.ac.uk

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Point-of-choice prompts consistently increase stair climbing; a greater increase in overweight than normal weight individuals was reported in a multi-component worksite campaign.

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this study is to investigate effects of a multi-component campaign, on stair climbing, in a public access setting.

METHODS:

In an interrupted-time-series-design, baseline observations (2 weeks) preceded a 2-week point-of-choice prompt. An additional message, positioned at the top of the climb for a further 6-week period, summarised the calorific consequences of a single ascent. Inconspicuous observers recorded traveller's methods of ascent, coded by sex and weight status, twice a week between 08:00 and 09:59.

RESULTS:

At baseline, the overweight chose stairs less than normal weight individuals. The multi-component campaign targeting weight control reversed this bias, increasing stair climbing only in overweight individuals.

CONCLUSIONS:

The specificity of the effect confirms the appeal of this lifestyle activity for the overweight. The discussion focuses on how intentions to control weight may be converted into behaviour.

PMID:
21618070
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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