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J Vis Exp. 2011 May 11;(51). pii: 2782. doi: 10.3791/2782.

An in vivo rodent model of contraction-induced injury and non-invasive monitoring of recovery.

Author information

  • 1Department of Physiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, MD, USA. rlovering@som.umaryland.edu

Abstract

Muscle strains are one of the most common complaints treated by physicians. A muscle injury is typically diagnosed from the patient history and physical exam alone, however the clinical presentation can vary greatly depending on the extent of injury, the patient's pain tolerance, etc. In patients with muscle injury or muscle disease, assessment of muscle damage is typically limited to clinical signs, such as tenderness, strength, range of motion, and more recently, imaging studies. Biological markers, such as serum creatine kinase levels, are typically elevated with muscle injury, but their levels do not always correlate with the loss of force production. This is even true of histological findings from animals, which provide a "direct measure" of damage, but do not account for all the loss of function. Some have argued that the most comprehensive measure of the overall health of the muscle in contractile force. Because muscle injury is a random event that occurs under a variety of biomechanical conditions, it is difficult to study. Here, we describe an in vivo animal model to measure torque and to produce a reliable muscle injury. We also describe our model for measurement of force from an isolated muscle in situ. Furthermore, we describe our small animal MRI procedure.

PMID:
21610671
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3197128
Free PMC Article
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