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BMC Med Res Methodol. 2011 May 18;11:72. doi: 10.1186/1471-2288-11-72.

Concordance of self-reported and medical chart information on cancer diagnosis and treatment.

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  • 1Department of Cancer Control & Prevention, Shanghai Municipal Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 1380 Zhongshan Road West, Shanghai 200336, China.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Self-reported information is an important tool for collecting clinical information for epidemiologic studies and in clinical settings where electronic medical records are not employed and shared.

METHODS:

Using data collected from the Shanghai Breast Cancer Survival Study (SBCSS), a population-based, prospective cohort study of 5,042 women diagnosed with breast cancer in Shanghai, China, we compared the concordance of patient questionnaire responses to a survey administered approximately 6 months after cancer diagnosis with medical chart information obtained from the diagnostic hospitals for several disease and treatment-related variables.

RESULTS:

Of 5,042 SBCSS participants, medical chart information was available for 4,948 women (98.1%). Concordance between patient self-reported and medical chart information was high for the majority of disease-related variables, including: diagnosing hospital (agreement: 98.7%, kappa: 0.99), type of surgery conducted (94.0%, 0.53), ER/PR status (94.5%, 0.91), and tumor position (98.2%, 0.97), as well as for important calendar dates, such as date of diagnosis, surgery, and first chemotherapy treatment. The 10 most commonly used chemotherapeutic drugs were all reported with agreement rates of at least 82%, with associated kappa values that ranged from 0.41 for calcium folinate to 0.76 for vinorelbine.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our study found high validity for patient self-reported information for a variety of disease and treatment-related variables, suggesting the utility of self-reports as an important source of clinical information for both epidemiological research and patient care.

PMID:
21592352
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3118949
Free PMC Article
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